Trinity Cathedral

Image Number: 00254
<br>Altar and sanctuary at Trinity Cathedral
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--Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Image Number: 00255
<br>Sanctuary at Trinity Cathedral
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--Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Image Number: 00256
<br>Apse at Trinity Cathedral
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--Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Image Number: 00257
<br>Detail of pulpit at Trinity Cathedral
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--Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Image Number: 00258
<br>Stained glass window at Trinity Cathedral
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--Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Image Number: 06051
<br>Sanctuary at Trinity Cathedral<br>
--Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Image Number: 06052
<br>Sanctuary at Trinity Cathedral<br>
--Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Image Number: 06053
<br>Sanctuary at Trinity Cathedral<br>
--Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Image Number: 06054
<br>Trinity Cathedral belltower<br>
--Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Image Number: 06055
<br>Steps in front of Trinity Cathedral<br>
--Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Location Name:  Trinity Cathedral (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania)

Location Type:  Church (Episcopal)

Year Completed:  1872

Architect(s):  Gordon W. Lloyd

History:  

Trinity Cathedral can trace its history back to 1787 when descendants of William Penn granted land to the congregation’s forefathers. Previously used as an American Indian burial ground, the site of the current structure has been used as a burial site for centuries. In 1824, when Trinity Church moved to the site from two blocks westward, many graves were removed and relocated to make way for the new construction. An estimated 4,000 people were once buried on the site, but today only 128 remain in the Trinity Churchyard.

In 1872, the current structure was completed. Designed by architect Gordon W. Lloyd, Trinity Church (it was not yet a Cathedral) was a Gothic Revival masterpiece. One of the most significant features of the church is the carved stone pulpit, built in 1922 to the design of Bertram G. Goodhue. The Episcopal Diocese of Pittsburgh made Trinity its Cathedral church in 1928.

Trinity Cathedral and what is left of the churchyard are historic reminders of Pittsburgh’s past. Now surrounded by the hustle and bustle of city life, one can find the final resting place of notables such as Red Pole (a principal chief of the Shawnee Indian Nation) and Dr. Nathaniel Bedford (Pittsburgh’s first physician and founder of the University of Pittsburgh) in Trinity’s shadow. Also, worthy of note is the small eatery sharing the Trinity building. Franktuary offers vegetarian, organic beef, and gourmet hot dogs to churchgoers and passersby alike.

Click here to visit Trinity Cathedral’s website.

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