Olentangy Indian Caverns

Image Number: 00555
<br>Olentangy Indian Caverns
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--Delaware County, Ohio Image Number: 00556
<br>Stairway descending into Olentangy Indian Caverns
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--Delaware County, Ohio Image Number: 00557
<br>Olentangy Indian Caverns
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--Delaware County, Ohio Image Number: 00558
<br>Water-covered moss at Olentangy Indian Caverns
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--Delaware County, Ohio Image Number: 00559
<br>Rock formations in progress at Olentangy Indian Caverns
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--Delaware County, Ohio Image Number: 00560
<br>Ceiling at Olentangy Indian Caverns
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--Delaware County, Ohio

Location Name:  Olentangy Indian Caverns (Delaware County, Ohio)

Location Type:  Cave

Year Discovered:  Not known, Re-discovered in 1821

Architect(s):  Mother Nature

History:  

The Olentangy Indian Caverns were formed millions of years ago as an underground river slowly carved its way through the subterranean limestone rock. The cave is made up of at least three levels with the fourth being the underground river that created the system. It is known that the caverns have been used by Native Americans; notably the Wyandotte tribe, for many years. They used the caverns for shelter from the weather as well as protection from their enemies. Evidence found in the cave tells that the Wyandotte used the cave to produce weapons as late as 1815. Council Rock, a formation in the caverns, was used for tribal ceremonies.

As the Americans pushed further westward into what was then Indian Territory, they eventually reached the land above the caverns. The first white man known to have entered the caverns was J. M. Adams in 1821. Part of a westward wagon train that had stopped in the area briefly, Adams found the cave when his wandering ox fell through the cave entrance. He inscribed his name on the cave walls before moving on. Today the cave is open to tourists as it has been since 1935.

Click here to visit Olentangy Indian Caverns’ website.

Sources